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Life Data Labs, Inc.

Farrier's Formula®

Farrier's Formula® Trial

Farrier's Formula® Trial

We gratefully appreciate the following case study submitted by:
Defence Animal Center Melton Mowbray Sqt Alex Mercer

Introduction

This trial was carried out at the Veterinary Hospital at the Defence Animal Centre, Melton Mowbray.

The trial ran for 16 weeks (07/01/08- 28/04/08) and involved the strict feeding regime of mollased chop, sugar beet and dampened hay for the first eight weeks. The second eight weeks Farrier's Formula® was introduced to the diet. This feeding regime was given to two candidates/horses which I felt would benefit from the trial and the product.

The two candidates were complete opposites, one a pony the other a horse, one had good quality hoof wall the other didn't. The pony was carrying a good amount of weight; the horse I feel could have done with a bit more coverage in general. But one thing they did have in common was the amount of foot growth, this was very little.

The results were taken by measurement from a burn mark which was situated 24mm below the coronary band on the hoof wall and a digital caliper was used to get an accurate reading ( digital caliper could read 1/10th of a mm)

Farrier's School: Barleycorn

Farrier's School: Barleycorn

Farrier's School: Barleycorn

Farrier's School: Barleycorn

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Farrier's School: Barleycorn

 

 

 

 

 

Farrier's School: Platinum

 

 

Farrier's School: Platinum

Farrier's School: Platinum

Farrier's School: Platinum

Farrier's School: Platinum

Farrier's School: Platinum

 

Candidate No. 1

Name: Barleycorn

Breed: Welsh section C x Conemarra

Sex: Mare

Age: 18 yrs

Size: 13 hands 1"

Weight: 438kgs (at the start of trial)

Type of Work: Military pack pony

Miscellaneous Information

Been in the military system for 7 yrs.

Used frequently on pack pony courses (work involved = small % of road work, field work and school work carrying weight of up to 150kgs ).

Has had some history of laminitis which was previous to her joining the Army.

Currently been bare foot for 3 yrs due to restriction & lack of road work.

This mare is currently up to date with all injections, inoculations and worming as of the start of the trial.

 


Foot and Horn Conditions

Fore Feet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Right Hind

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Left Hind

As you can see from the pictures the feet are of a good strong horn and are in a reasonable condition, some of the growth rings are quite prominent but are nothing to worry about.

She has a small a amount of foot underneath and a good hard sole, but the rate of growth is restricted hence the reason why she is involved in this trial

Pre Supplement Trial

07/01/08 - Distance from coronary band = 24mm Weight = 438kg

14/01/08 - Distance from coronary band = 24.8mm Weight = 437kg

21/01/08 - Distance from coronary band = 25.7mnn Weight = 440kg

28/01/08 - Distance from coronary band = 26.4mm Weight = 439kg

04/02/08 - Distance from coronary band = 27mm Weight = 439kg

11/02/08 - Distance from coronary band = 27. 7mm Weight = 441kg

18/02/08 - Distance from coronary band = 28.5mm Weight = 439kg

25/02/08 - Distance from coronary band = 29.3mm Weight = 439kg

03/03/08 - Distance from coronary band = 30mm Weight = 442kg

Total Amount of Growth = 6mm Average Weekly Growth = 0.75mm Total Weight Gained = 3kg Average Weekly Weight Gain = 0.375kg

Trial With Farrier's Formula®

Amount given per feed = 1 cup

10/03/08 - Distance from coronary band = 24mm Weight = 439kg

17/03/08 - Distance from coronary band = 24.9mm Weight = 441kg

24/03/08 - Distance from coronary band = 25.9mnn Weight = 442kg

31/03/08 - Distance from coronary band = 27mm Weight = 443kg

07/04/08 - Distance from coronary band = 28.4mm Weight = 446kg

14/04/08 - Distance from coronary band = 29.9mm Weight = 446kg

21/04/08 - Distance from coronary band = 31.5mm Weight = 447kg

28/04/08 - Distance from coronary band = 33.2mm Weight = 448kg

Total Amount of Growth = 9.2mm

Average Weekly Growth = 1.15mm

Total Weight Gained = 9kg

Average Weekly Weight Gain = 1.125kg


Conclusion for Candidate No. 1

The improvment within the horn quality was not clearly visible but however the growth rate and general condition of this mare did improve and I am sure that the longer the trial, the more impressive the results would have been.




Candidate No 2

Name: Platinum

Breed: Irish Draught x Thoroughbred

Sex: Gelding

Age: 19 yrs

Size: 16 hands 3"

Weight: 527 kgs (at the start of the trial)

Type of Work: Riding school work and small % of road work

Miscellenous Information

Been in the army system for 15yrs and was sold to a civilian owner 8 months before this trial started, but is kept and stabled at the DAC

No previous history of laminitis, currently shod all-round

This gelding is currently up to date with all injections, inoculations and worming as of the start of the trial.


Foot and Horn Quality

Left Fore

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Right Fore

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Left Hind

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Right Hind

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This horse has poor feet, at the start of this trial they were in a poor condition with a lot of cracks, splits and chips within the hoof wall structure. I was given permission by the owner to involve this horse as she was "fed up with his feet" and would be grateful for any help. It is felt that the horse's feet are more suited to hand made shoes as his feet are not a good shape, therefore a machine made shoe may not offer him the support like a handmade shoe.

This horse does not grow a lot of wall hence the reason he is involved in the trial, but his sole quality is good and at the end of each shoe1ng cycle, there is plenty of it this will offer him good protection and may take a small % of his body weight of the hoof wall.

Pre Supplement Trial

07/01/08 - Distance from coronary band = 24mm Weight = 527kg

14/01/08 - Distance from coronary band = 24.9mm Weight = 528kg

21/01/08 - Distance from coronary band = 25.8mm Weight = 527kg

28/01/08 - Distance from coronary band = 26.8mm Weight = 529kg

04/02/08 - Distance from coronary band = 27. 7mm Weight = 529kg

11/02/08 - Distance from coronary band = 28.9mm Weight = 529kg

18/02/08 - Distance from coronary band = 29.7mm Weight = 528kg

25/02108 - Distance from coronary band = 30.5mm Weight = 529kg

03/03/08 - Distance from coronary band = 31.2mm Weight = 529kg

Total Amount of Growth = 7.2mm Average Weekly Growth = 0.9mm Total Weight Gained = 2kg Average Weekly Weight Gain = 0.25kg

Trial With Farrier's Formula®

Amount given per feed = 1 1/4 cups

10/03/08 - Distance from coronary band = 24mm Weight = 528kg

17/03/08 - Distance from coronary band = 24.9mm Weight = 530kg

24/03/08 - Distance from coronary band = 26.1mm Weight = 532kg

31/03/08 - Distance from coronary band = 27.5mm Weight = 533kg

07/04/08 - Distance from coronary band = 29.3mm Weight = 532kg

14/04/08 - Distance from coronary band = 31.1mm Weight = 533kg

21/04/08 - Distance from coronary band = 32.9mm Weight = 534kg

28/04/08 - Distance from coronary band = 35mm Weight = 535kg

Total Amount of Growth = 11mm

Average Weekly Growth = 1.375mm

Total Weight Gained = 7kg

Average Weekly Weight Gain = 0.875kg


Conclusion for Candidate No. 2

The feet on this horse improved dramatically and the general hoof quality was superior compared with the start of the trial. This was very obvious when shoeing him because there was more foot to take off and there were fewer cracks and splits than before.

Farrier's School: Barleycorn

Farrier's School: Barleycorn

Farrier's School: Barleycorn

Farrier's School: Barleycorn

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Farrier's School: Barleycorn

 

 

 

 

 

Farrier's School: Platinum

 

 

Farrier's School: Platinum

Farrier's School: Platinum

Farrier's School: Platinum

Farrier's School: Platinum

Farrier's School: Platinum

 

Candidate No. 1

Name: Barleycorn

Breed: Welsh section C x Conemarra

Sex: Mare

Age: 18 yrs

Size: 13 hands 1"

Weight: 438kgs (at the start of trial)

Type of Work: Military pack pony

Miscellaneous Information

Been in the military system for 7 yrs.

Used frequently on pack pony courses (work involved = small % of road work, field work and school work carrying weight of up to 150kgs ).

Has had some history of laminitis which was previous to her joining the Army.

Currently been bare foot for 3 yrs due to restriction & lack of road work.

This mare is currently up to date with all injections, inoculations and worming as of the start of the trial.

 


Foot and Horn Conditions

Fore Feet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Right Hind

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Left Hind

As you can see from the pictures the feet are of a good strong horn and are in a reasonable condition, some of the growth rings are quite prominent but are nothing to worry about.

She has a small a amount of foot underneath and a good hard sole, but the rate of growth is restricted hence the reason why she is involved in this trial

Pre Supplement Trial

07/01/08 - Distance from coronary band = 24mm Weight = 438kg

14/01/08 - Distance from coronary band = 24.8mm Weight = 437kg

21/01/08 - Distance from coronary band = 25.7mnn Weight = 440kg

28/01/08 - Distance from coronary band = 26.4mm Weight = 439kg

04/02/08 - Distance from coronary band = 27mm Weight = 439kg

11/02/08 - Distance from coronary band = 27. 7mm Weight = 441kg

18/02/08 - Distance from coronary band = 28.5mm Weight = 439kg

25/02/08 - Distance from coronary band = 29.3mm Weight = 439kg

03/03/08 - Distance from coronary band = 30mm Weight = 442kg

Total Amount of Growth = 6mm Average Weekly Growth = 0.75mm Total Weight Gained = 3kg Average Weekly Weight Gain = 0.375kg

Trial With Farrier's Formula®

Amount given per feed = 1 cup

10/03/08 - Distance from coronary band = 24mm Weight = 439kg

17/03/08 - Distance from coronary band = 24.9mm Weight = 441kg

24/03/08 - Distance from coronary band = 25.9mnn Weight = 442kg

31/03/08 - Distance from coronary band = 27mm Weight = 443kg

07/04/08 - Distance from coronary band = 28.4mm Weight = 446kg

14/04/08 - Distance from coronary band = 29.9mm Weight = 446kg

21/04/08 - Distance from coronary band = 31.5mm Weight = 447kg

28/04/08 - Distance from coronary band = 33.2mm Weight = 448kg

Total Amount of Growth = 9.2mm

Average Weekly Growth = 1.15mm

Total Weight Gained = 9kg

Average Weekly Weight Gain = 1.125kg


Conclusion for Candidate No. 1

The improvment within the horn quality was not clearly visible but however the growth rate and general condition of this mare did improve and I am sure that the longer the trial, the more impressive the results would have been.




Candidate No 2

Name: Platinum

Breed: Irish Draught x Thoroughbred

Sex: Gelding

Age: 19 yrs

Size: 16 hands 3"

Weight: 527 kgs (at the start of the trial)

Type of Work: Riding school work and small % of road work

Miscellenous Information

Been in the army system for 15yrs and was sold to a civilian owner 8 months before this trial started, but is kept and stabled at the DAC

No previous history of laminitis, currently shod all-round

This gelding is currently up to date with all injections, inoculations and worming as of the start of the trial.


Foot and Horn Quality

Left Fore

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Right Fore

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Left Hind

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Right Hind

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This horse has poor feet, at the start of this trial they were in a poor condition with a lot of cracks, splits and chips within the hoof wall structure. I was given permission by the owner to involve this horse as she was "fed up with his feet" and would be grateful for any help. It is felt that the horse's feet are more suited to hand made shoes as his feet are not a good shape, therefore a machine made shoe may not offer him the support like a handmade shoe.

This horse does not grow a lot of wall hence the reason he is involved in the trial, but his sole quality is good and at the end of each shoe1ng cycle, there is plenty of it this will offer him good protection and may take a small % of his body weight of the hoof wall.

Pre Supplement Trial

07/01/08 - Distance from coronary band = 24mm Weight = 527kg

14/01/08 - Distance from coronary band = 24.9mm Weight = 528kg

21/01/08 - Distance from coronary band = 25.8mm Weight = 527kg

28/01/08 - Distance from coronary band = 26.8mm Weight = 529kg

04/02/08 - Distance from coronary band = 27. 7mm Weight = 529kg

11/02/08 - Distance from coronary band = 28.9mm Weight = 529kg

18/02/08 - Distance from coronary band = 29.7mm Weight = 528kg

25/02108 - Distance from coronary band = 30.5mm Weight = 529kg

03/03/08 - Distance from coronary band = 31.2mm Weight = 529kg

Total Amount of Growth = 7.2mm Average Weekly Growth = 0.9mm Total Weight Gained = 2kg Average Weekly Weight Gain = 0.25kg

Trial With Farrier's Formula®

Amount given per feed = 1 1/4 cups

10/03/08 - Distance from coronary band = 24mm Weight = 528kg

17/03/08 - Distance from coronary band = 24.9mm Weight = 530kg

24/03/08 - Distance from coronary band = 26.1mm Weight = 532kg

31/03/08 - Distance from coronary band = 27.5mm Weight = 533kg

07/04/08 - Distance from coronary band = 29.3mm Weight = 532kg

14/04/08 - Distance from coronary band = 31.1mm Weight = 533kg

21/04/08 - Distance from coronary band = 32.9mm Weight = 534kg

28/04/08 - Distance from coronary band = 35mm Weight = 535kg

Total Amount of Growth = 11mm

Average Weekly Growth = 1.375mm

Total Weight Gained = 7kg

Average Weekly Weight Gain = 0.875kg


Conclusion for Candidate No. 2

The feet on this horse improved dramatically and the general hoof quality was superior compared with the start of the trial. This was very obvious when shoeing him because there was more foot to take off and there were fewer cracks and splits than before.

 

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Hoof Canker

Hoof Canker

canker

canker

canker

canker

canker

canker

canker

canker

canker

canker

 

We gratefully appreciate the following case study submitted by:
Ms. Dr med vet I.Schweikardt


Canker of the hoof

Canker of the hoof is a cauliflower-like growth on the corium, the frog and the adjoining parts of the hoof. Biopsies of the diseased tissue show that the damage is the result of an infectious inflammation of the corium that is caused by gram negative anaerobic bacteria in the germ layer of the uppermost layer of the skin (epidermis). Mostly it seems that the horn-producing cells are less affected than the inter-tubular horn. From this a mass of isolated horn beads result that are surrounded by a cheese-like, white mass of pus. Because this infection affects the deepest layers of the skin, the prognosis is difficult, time-consuming and expensive.
The causes are still unclear. It is assumed that in many cases a long duration of thrush can lead to a degeneration of the cells. Observations have been made that canker of the frog occurs more frequently in certain breeds of horses (cold-blooded heavy types of horses). Also the care and feeding of the horse plays a great role



Therapy

The treatment of canker of the frog is very difficult, requires a great deal of time and does not always lead to complete recovery. The 12-year-old thoroughbred gelding shown on the photos was used as a therapy horse for handicapped children before the cancer set in. It was kept in a group in open boxes whereby the feed was restricted to pure oats (concentrated feed). Hay was always available. Its exercising area and box were mucked out and cleaned every day.

 

The change of feed

The change of feed began slowly the day the horse arrived. It was changed from pure oat feed (3 kg a day) to a muesli ( 1.5 kg a day) and parallel to this was slowly put onto Farrier's Formula®, increasing the amount slowly within 14 days so that the horse was then being given 1.5 measuring cups per day.

 

Considered incurable

The horse came to us in the summer of 2006 after completion of treatment and was considered as incurable. When admitted the horse showed a severe contraction of the toes on one of the front hoofs. This was causing the bulb to be displaced upwards. The hoof that was decaying as a result of the canker of the frog showed changes in the frog at the bars and the side wall. This side wall had a cleft in the horn with a distinct change in the layer of lamellae. As the horse was shod at the time, the shoes were removed as part of the preliminary treatment. This is important in order to activate the hoof mechanism as well as possible. Most farriers work with closed shoe (temporary or cover shoes?) as heavy bleeding can occur and these shoes produce more pressure on the sole. If at all possible we work without closed shoe only with bandages that are changed daily. All hoofs were abraded and corrected as well as possible at intervals of four weeks. The affected leg was treated as follows under a local anaesthetic (as the treatment is very painful):


Start of the canker treatment

The right leg was bandaged above the pastern as a lot of blood is involved in the canker treatment. During the first stage the changes in the horn on the frog, on the bars and the side wall were cut away to the required depth. 4 further treatments followed at intervals of four weeks whereby the decayed tissue was cut away deeply as far as the healthy horn.


Second operation

During the 2nd operation almost the whole of the side wall was removed as the change in cells was apparent in the side wall.

 
Medication therapy

The bandage was changed every day under as sterile conditions as possible. Apart from correct feeding rinsing with iodine form ether and subsequent treatment with hoof canker powder on the affected parts including special cotton wool (Liegasano) is imperative during treatment. After the operations described above the horse was given a six-day antibiotic course and painkillers as required.



Rapid improvement in the hoof quality


Healthy hoof by October 2006

The horse was healthy by October 2006 and was discharged as cured.

canker

canker

canker

canker

canker

canker

canker

canker

canker

canker

 

We gratefully appreciate the following case study submitted by:
Ms. Dr med vet I.Schweikardt


Canker of the hoof

Canker of the hoof is a cauliflower-like growth on the corium, the frog and the adjoining parts of the hoof. Biopsies of the diseased tissue show that the damage is the result of an infectious inflammation of the corium that is caused by gram negative anaerobic bacteria in the germ layer of the uppermost layer of the skin (epidermis). Mostly it seems that the horn-producing cells are less affected than the inter-tubular horn. From this a mass of isolated horn beads result that are surrounded by a cheese-like, white mass of pus. Because this infection affects the deepest layers of the skin, the prognosis is difficult, time-consuming and expensive.
The causes are still unclear. It is assumed that in many cases a long duration of thrush can lead to a degeneration of the cells. Observations have been made that canker of the frog occurs more frequently in certain breeds of horses (cold-blooded heavy types of horses). Also the care and feeding of the horse plays a great role

 

 

 

 


Therapy

The treatment of canker of the frog is very difficult, requires a great deal of time and does not always lead to complete recovery. The 12-year-old thoroughbred gelding shown on the photos was used as a therapy horse for handicapped children before the cancer set in. It was kept in a group in open boxes whereby the feed was restricted to pure oats (concentrated feed). Hay was always available. Its exercising area and box were mucked out and cleaned every day.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The change of feed

The change of feed began slowly the day the horse arrived. It was changed from pure oat feed (3 kg a day) to a muesli ( 1.5 kg a day) and parallel to this was slowly put onto Farrier's Formula®, increasing the amount slowly within 14 days so that the horse was then being given 1.5 measuring cups per day.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Considered incurable

The horse came to us in the summer of 2006 after completion of treatment and was considered as incurable. When admitted the horse showed a severe contraction of the toes on one of the front hoofs. This was causing the bulb to be displaced upwards. The hoof that was decaying as a result of the canker of the frog showed changes in the frog at the bars and the side wall. This side wall had a cleft in the horn with a distinct change in the layer of lamellae. As the horse was shod at the time, the shoes were removed as part of the preliminary treatment. This is important in order to activate the hoof mechanism as well as possible. Most farriers work with closed shoe (temporary or cover shoes?) as heavy bleeding can occur and these shoes produce more pressure on the sole. If at all possible we work without closed shoe only with bandages that are changed daily. All hoofs were abraded and corrected as well as possible at intervals of four weeks. The affected leg was treated as follows under a local anaesthetic (as the treatment is very painful):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Start of the canker treatment

The right leg was bandaged above the pastern as a lot of blood is involved in the canker treatment. During the first stage the changes in the horn on the frog, on the bars and the side wall were cut away to the required depth. 4 further treatments followed at intervals of four weeks whereby the decayed tissue was cut away deeply as far as the healthy horn.

 

 

 

 


Second operation

During the 2nd operation almost the whole of the side wall was removed as the change in cells was apparent in the side wall.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Medication therapy

The bandage was changed every day under as sterile conditions as possible. Apart from correct feeding rinsing with iodine form ether and subsequent treatment with hoof canker powder on the affected parts including special cotton wool (Liegasano) is imperative during treatment. After the operations described above the horse was given a six-day antibiotic course and painkillers as required.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Rapid improvement in the hoof quality

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Healthy hoof by October 2006

The horse was healthy by October 2006 and was discharged as cured.

 

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Anna Morgan

Anna Morgan

anna morgan

 

"Doyville is a 16hh thoroughbred gelding by Doyoun out of Mannevillette with Epson Derby winner Mill Reef as his paternal grandsire and Kentucky Derby winner Foolish Pleasure as his maternal grandsire. He is half brother to successful racehorse and now stallion Daylami. Doy was bought for me in 1995 by my Mum as an early 18th birthday present, he was 3 and I was 14, so I have owned him for nearly 17 years over which time we have forged a close partnership and shared some brilliant times. He has always been incredibly laid back with a kind and sometimes mischievous temperament. My 9 year old nephew has been leading and riding him since he was a toddler but I tell people that he also has a 'ferrari' engine and can gallop with the best of them. We have done a bit of everything over the years and now we mostly enjoy hacking and fun rides.

 

I started feeding Doy Farrier's Formula in 1996 as I was finding it difficult to keep shoes on him - his hoof wall crumbled easily and he often had risen clenches or loose shoes. He has been given Farrier's Formula for nearly 16 years. During this time his hooves have improved tremendously. I attribute this to a combination of Farriers Formula, Life Data Hoof Disinfectant and a good farrier. Doy also has an incredibly shiny coat and people are always commenting on how well he looks. He is a testament to Farrier's Formula and I no longer have to worry about his shoes staying on."

 

Anna
Wiltshire, UK

anna morgan

"Doyville is a 16hh thoroughbred gelding by Doyoun out of Mannevillette with Epson Derby winner Mill Reef as his paternal grandsire and Kentucky Derby winner Foolish Pleasure as his maternal grandsire. He is half brother to successful racehorse and now stallion Daylami. Doy was bought for me in 1995 by my Mum as an early 18th birthday present, he was 3 and I was 14, so I have owned him for nearly 17 years over which time we have forged a close partnership and shared some brilliant times. He has always been incredibly laid back with a kind and sometimes mischievous temperament. My 9 year old nephew has been leading and riding him since he was a toddler but I tell people that he also has a 'ferrari' engine and can gallop with the best of them. We have done a bit of everything over the years and now we mostly enjoy hacking and fun rides.

 

I started feeding Doy Farrier's Formula in 1996 as I was finding it difficult to keep shoes on him - his hoof wall crumbled easily and he often had risen clenches or loose shoes. He has been given Farrier's Formula for nearly 16 years. During this time his hooves have improved tremendously. I attribute this to a combination of Farriers Formula, Life Data Hoof Disinfectant and a good farrier. Doy also has an incredibly shiny coat and people are always commenting on how well he looks. He is a testament to Farrier's Formula and I no longer have to worry about his shoes staying on."

 

Anna
Wiltshire, UK

 

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Undine Schneeweiß

Undine Schneeweiß

undine

undine

 

Improved hoof quality thanks to Life Data products

 

Last winter my horse (warmblood, gelding, 16 years old) suffered increasingly from thrush and crumbling horn on the wall of the hoof. This had been partly worsened by its wearing closed horseshoes.
During my search for products to treat the thrush without having an aggressive effect on the horn, I happened to visit the stand of Life Data Labs, INC. in Aachen. Mrs. Karen Zetsche, the European sales representative, advised me most competently and was able to convince me that I should use the combination of special feeding and hoof care with Life Data products.

 

Since the middle of July I have been giving my horse a ¾ measure per day of Farrier's Formula Double Concentrate, a feed supplement for improving the hoof structure. I am continuing to treat the hooves, in particular the frog and the collateral grooves, with Life Data Hoof Dressing, a substance for treating the bacteria and fungi that damage the horn. Now that the wet season has begun and the horse has to stand on the sand paddock, I also use with "The Right Step" for the hooves. This is a hoof-care product which provides special protection against environmental dampness. Although I do not apply the care products daily, as recommended, after only four months there is already a distinct improvement visible in the horn structure. Until the complete regeneration of the hooves I will keep to the dosage of Farrier's Formula Double Concentrates. Afterwards, I will change over to permanent feeding and will halve the dosage.
Thanks to the photo documentation of the course of the hoof improvement, I have a better overview of the positive development. I can strongly recommend this treatment for improving hoof quality!

 

Undine Schneeweiß
13129 Berlin

undine

undine

 

 

 

Improved hoof quality thanks to Life Data products

 

Last winter my horse (warmblood, gelding, 16 years old) suffered increasingly from thrush and crumbling horn on the wall of the hoof. This had been partly worsened by its wearing closed horseshoes.
During my search for products to treat the thrush without having an aggressive effect on the horn, I happened to visit the stand of Life Data Labs, INC. in Aachen. Mrs. Karen Zetsche, the European sales representative, advised me most competently and was able to convince me that I should use the combination of special feeding and hoof care with Life Data products.

 

Since the middle of July I have been giving my horse a ¾ measure per day of Farrier's Formula Double Concentrate, a feed supplement for improving the hoof structure. I am continuing to treat the hooves, in particular the frog and the collateral grooves, with Life Data Hoof Dressing, a substance for treating the bacteria and fungi that damage the horn. Now that the wet season has begun and the horse has to stand on the sand paddock, I also use with "The Right Step" for the hooves. This is a hoof-care product which provides special protection against environmental dampness. Although I do not apply the care products daily, as recommended, after only four months there is already a distinct improvement visible in the horn structure. Until the complete regeneration of the hooves I will keep to the dosage of Farrier's Formula Double Concentrates. Afterwards, I will change over to permanent feeding and will halve the dosage.
Thanks to the photo documentation of the course of the hoof improvement, I have a better overview of the positive development. I can strongly recommend this treatment for improving hoof quality!

 

Undine Schneeweiß
13129 Berlin

 

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UTOPIA - Martin Matousek

UTOPIA - Martin Matousek

utopia

 

Utopia takes a shine to Farrier's Formula

 

When people started asking him what he had done to his horse to make his coat shine, Martin Matousek was a bit taken aback. "I'm quite a lazy person when it comes to grooming," he says, "but even we could see what an incredible coat Utopia had".

 

For Martin, the 10-year-old Dutch warmblood's coat is just a welcome side-effect for the Swiss show jumper, who rides for pleasure and takes part in up to 20 competitions a year. But having a horse that was always casting shoes was no recipe for success.

 

People started noticing Utopia's shiny coat soon after Martin started feeding Farrier's Formula at the suggestion of his blacksmith. "When I bought my horse about five years ago, he had very poor hooves. His hoof wall kept breaking and he was always losing his shoes." But within a few months, Utopia's hoof quality was already much better. A year later, not only had he stopped casting his shoes, but his coat was looking tremendous. Martin was so impressed with the results that he also tried the supplement on his younger horse, Cinedine, a five-year-old Swiss warmblood. A fissure in his hoof had disappeared just five months later.

 

"We've achieved fantastic results," says Martin. "If you consider that a hoof needs about a year to regrow, the effect you can see after about six months are just amazing!" Martin is now feeding Farrier's Formula and Barn Bag Adult Maintenance to three horses and is impressed by how well the feed has been accepted. With such a huge choice on the market, it can be hard to find the right product, in Martin's experience. But for him, his blacksmith's recommendation has really paid off. "With Farrier's Formula you really get what you pay for," he says. The shine is just the bonus.

utopia

 

 

 

 

Utopia takes a shine to Farrier's Formula

 

When people started asking him what he had done to his horse to make his coat shine, Martin Matousek was a bit taken aback. "I'm quite a lazy person when it comes to grooming," he says, "but even we could see what an incredible coat Utopia had".

 

For Martin, the 10-year-old Dutch warmblood's coat is just a welcome side-effect for the Swiss show jumper, who rides for pleasure and takes part in up to 20 competitions a year. But having a horse that was always casting shoes was no recipe for success.

 

People started noticing Utopia's shiny coat soon after Martin started feeding Farrier's Formula at the suggestion of his blacksmith. "When I bought my horse about five years ago, he had very poor hooves. His hoof wall kept breaking and he was always losing his shoes." But within a few months, Utopia's hoof quality was already much better. A year later, not only had he stopped casting his shoes, but his coat was looking tremendous. Martin was so impressed with the results that he also tried the supplement on his younger horse, Cinedine, a five-year-old Swiss warmblood. A fissure in his hoof had disappeared just five months later.

 

"We've achieved fantastic results," says Martin. "If you consider that a hoof needs about a year to regrow, the effect you can see after about six months are just amazing!" Martin is now feeding Farrier's Formula and Barn Bag Adult Maintenance to three horses and is impressed by how well the feed has been accepted. With such a huge choice on the market, it can be hard to find the right product, in Martin's experience. But for him, his blacksmith's recommendation has really paid off. "With Farrier's Formula you really get what you pay for," he says. The shine is just the bonus.

 

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12290 Hwy 72
Cherokee, Alabama
35616
Product of the USA
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+1 800 624 1873
+1 256 370 7555
Fax: +1 256 370 7509
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Privacy Policy