Equine Hoof and Joint Health

Correlations Between Equine Hoof and Joint Health: PART 2

In Part 1 of “Correlations Between Equine Hoof and Joint Health,” we discussed how nutrition and body condition are two major factors influencing the health of equine hooves and joints. In part 2, we will concentrate on external and mechanical elements that could be creating stress on your horse’s hooves and joints. Many of the hoof and joint problems we see today can be attributed to the long-term effects of offloading, exposure to hard terrain, and unbalanced hooves.

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Equine Hoof and Joint Health

Correlations Between Equine Hoof and Joint Health: PART 1

Have you ever considered the substantial influence the health of our horse’s hooves and joints have on one another? For example, can poor hoof quality negatively impact joint health? Can a joint injury add extra strain to the hoof? It is easy to look at our horse’s health from a narrow perspective, only considering the problem at hand. When it comes to the longevity and comfort of the horse, we need to look at the whole picture. The horse’s joints and hooves function together in its movement and balance. When one is afflicted, the other is often affected as well. Effects from offloading, poor nutrition, hoof balance, terrain, and body condition accumulate over time, weakening the horse’s extremities and creating real problems in the horse’s locomotion. These influences become even more important for older horses, who are more susceptible to joint pain, arthritis, and hoof problems such as laminitis. In part one of this blog, we will discuss the impact that body condition and nutrition have on the health of the hooves and joints.

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Mud Fever

Mud Fever

What is Mud Fever?

Mud Fever or equine pastern dermatitis is a bacterial infection of the epidermis of a horse’s lower limbs.  The lesions are usually located between the fetlock joint and heel but can spread to the upper part of the leg. Occasionally, the back and neck of the horse may also become affected. Horses with pink and non-pigmented skin, white hair or feathers are particularly susceptible to mud fever.

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Horse with laminitis

5 Tips to Feeding Horses with Laminitis

It is vital for Horses with laminitis to receive a balanced diet that fulfills their nutritional requirements. Fulfilling these nutritional needs not only benefits laminitis recovery but can also help prevent future bouts from developing. Additionally, your horse’s current diet could be the cause of its laminitic troubles. Below are five tips to feeding horses with laminitis.

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Hoof Abscess Recovery

Five Tips for Hoof Abscess Recovery

With the development of a hoof abscess, an energetic and active horse can suddenly become severely lame. It can happen quickly, painfully, and with no prior signs of a problem. Finding your horse in this state can be terrifying, especially if you’ve had little experience dealing with a hoof abscess. Luckily, with time, patience and proper treatment most horses will fully recover. In this blog, we will discuss five tips that can be utilized to assist in your horse’s recovery.

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Brushing Horse Hair Coat

The Importance of a Healthy Equine Skin and Coat

As spring arrives, we tend to focus on our horse’s hair coat as they begin to lose their woolly winter coats. And, show season is just around the corner. We put a substantial amount of importance on the outward appearance of our horse, and rightfully so, but your horse’s outward appearance says more about your horse than you may know. Your horse’s beautiful coat is more than a bragging right. The quality of your horse’s hair coat reveals a lot about the overall state of your horse’s health. In fact, a decline in hair coat quality can be one of the first signs of a health-related issue, improper nutrition or poor maintenance.

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hoof abscess and hoof quality

The Relationship Between Hoof Quality and Recurring Hoof Abscesses

Hoof Abscesses can seem to appear overnight. Yesterday your horse showed no sign of pain, and today he can barely put weight on his foot. If you have never had a horse develop a hoof abscess, count yourself lucky. They can be extremely painful, often leading to severe lameness. Some horses suffer from recurring hoof abscesses that develop frequently.  Although hoof abscesses can be attributed to either the horse’s environment or the health of the hooves, they are often the consequence of a combination of both factors.

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A Recipe for Improved Hoof Health

A Recipe for Improved Hoof Health

How many times have you planned a meal and then realized you forgot an important ingredient? How many times have you had a slip of the hand, and turned your slightly salted mashed potatoes into a taste-bud-twisting salt mine? If you enjoy baking or cooking, you probably understand the importance of a recipe and the ingredients involved. You know that too much flour in a cake recipe can result in a cake that is dry and crumbly. Not enough flour and your cake will become a watery mess that no one wants to eat. The ingredients are essential and it’s important to utilize them in the correct balance and ratio to cook a masterful dish. The same analogy can be used when considering your horse’s hoof supplement. Without the correct ingredients in the proper ratios, a hoof supplement’s formula can be a recipe for disaster.

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5 Early Signs of Unhealthy Hooves

5 Early Signs of Unhealthy Hooves

Your horse will not verbally inform you of a hoof related problem. So, unless your horse is related to Mr. Ed, it’s your job as a horse owner to detect hoof issues. Luckily, there are signs to look for that can help you in this process. With a keen eye, knowledge of what to look for, and a commitment to maintain healthy hooves, these signs can help you address hoof problems before they become serious. Below are 5 early signs of unhealthy hooves:

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Itchy Horse

The Causes and Management of Sweet Itch (Summer Dermatitis)

Sweet itch in horses, also known as summer dermatitis, is an allergic hypersensitivity reaction to biting flies or midges. Midges breed and hatch in stagnant water, and are more abundant around dense vegetation. Although smaller than mosquitoes, they often make their presence known by flying in swarms of black clouds. The seasonal nature of the horse’s skin allergy is correlated with the life cycle of the midges.

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